• AD

Roman noblewoman’s tomb reveals secrets

Context:

If you are a Civil Engineer then you will obviously love this blog as we are going to discuss something in which, you will definitely get interested. So we are talking about ancient Rome's concrete structure. most substantial breaks and disintegrates. Designs worked in antiquated Rome are as yet standing, showing wonderful toughness regardless of conditions that would pulverize present-day concrete. One of these constructions is the huge tube-shaped burial chamber of first-century aristocrat Caecilia Metella. New examination shows that the nature of the substance of her burial place might surpass that of her male peers' landmarks in view of the volcanic total the developers picked and the surprising synthetic communications with downpour and groundwater with that total of more than two centuries.

Source: Pexels


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Specialty:

One of these constructions is the enormous tube-shaped burial chamber of first-century aristocrat Caecilia Metella. New examination shows that the nature of the substance of her burial chamber might surpass that of her male peers' landmarks in view of the volcanic total the manufacturers picked and the surprising compound connections with downpour and groundwater with that total of more than two centuries. Constructions are robust and innovative.


Caecilia Metella:

The Tomb of Caecilia Metella is a mausoleum located just outside Rome at the three-mile marker of the Via Appia. It was built during the 1st century BC to honor Caecilia Metella who was the daughter of Quintus Caecilius Metellus Creticus, a consul in 69 BC, and wife of Marcus Licinius Crassus who served under Julius Caesar and was the son of the famous triumvir Marcus Crassus. Located on top of a hill along the Via Appia, the Tomb of Caecilia Metella consists of a cylindrical drum, or rotunda, atop a square podium with the Caetani Castle (Castrum) attached at the rear. The square podium stands at 8.3 meters tall with the cylindrical drum standing at 12 m. The monument in totality stands at a height of 21.7 meters tall. The diameter of the circular drum is 29.5 m, equivalent to 100 Roman feet. Caecilia herself was an individual from a rich family, the girl of a Roman delegate. She wedded into the group of Marcus Lincius Crassus, a Roman general and legislator who framed a popular magistrate coalition with Julius Caesar and Pompey.