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Roman-era building unearthed under Israel's Western Wall

Updated: Jul 26

Context:

Cities like Jerusalem have been the epicentre of various cultural, religious beliefs and conflicts, store under the earth, much more than we can think of. Here, we discuss the ruins of a first-century building recently studied upon.

Source: Pixabay


Let's Deep Dive:

what has been found:

The remains of a huge building were unearthed by a team of archeologists in the tunnel which goes underneath the Western Wall in Jerusalem, Israel. Although parts of this building were uncovered in the 19th century after General Sir Charles Warren, one of the first archeologists of Europe, discovered it and a few other parts have also been brought out by other archeologists in the 20th century; all the parts which remained undiscovered, have been dug out in recent years. The recent excavations were conducted by institutes like Western Wall Heritage Foundation and the Israel Antiquities Authority.

The building comprised two hallways. There was a fountain, presumably between the two hallways. Water was supplied to this fountain through pipes from the top of the columns. Excavations have also revealed a small pool inside the building. It was stepped for people to descend into and it' walls were plastered.


The study:

The study as well as the excavations were conducted by a team of archeologists including Dr Shlomit Weksler-Bdolach from the Israel Antiquities Authority.

The funding came from the two institutions, Western Wall Heritage Foundation and the Israel Antiquities Authority.


What the study found: